2016 Grants Awarded

January 2017

The Jackson EMC Foundation board of directors awarded a total $103,750 in grants to organizations during their January meeting.

Organizational Grant Recipients:

  • $15,000 to Gainesville Action Ministries, a network of 25 Hall County congregations that work to prevent homelessness by providing emergency financial, food and clothing assistance, and children’s services, to provide rent assistance that enables clients to stay in their homes as well as case management for those clients and financial literacy training to help them break the cycle of poverty.
  • $15,000 to ACTION, Inc., an Athens based organization serving Barrow, Clarke, Jackson, Madison and Oglethorpe counties, for the Full Plate Food Program, which collects surplus food donated by Athens area restaurants and redistributes it to homeless shelters and other human service agencies, and for the Opportunities Now Program, which supports students seeking to improve their lives by completing a higher level of education.
  • $15,000 to the Gwinnett Environmental & Heritage Center, a multi-use science, history, culture, heritage and environmental facility located on a 700-acre campus in Buford, to allow students from low-income families in Barrow, Clarke, Gwinnett, Hall and Jackson counties to attend interpretative, hands-on field studies and educational programs.
  • $15,000 to the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society Georgia Chapter to help cover copayments for qualified blood cancer patients in the 10 counties Jackson EMC serves. The society provides copay assistance from $2,500 to $10,000 per year per patient, depending on their diagnosis, and assisted 84 patients in Jackson EMC’s service area during the first three quarters of 2016.
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  • $15,000 to The Tree House, a children’s advocacy center working to reduce child abuse in Banks, Barrow and Jackson counties, for the Family Services Supervised Visitation Program, which provides a neutral, child-friendly environment for visits between children in foster care and their parents to enable them to maintain and enhance family bonds and provide a safe and nurturing environment for their children when reunited.
  • $12,000 to Mercy Health Center, an Athens ministry using a community of professional and lay volunteers to provide primary and specialty medical care, dental and pharmacy services for low income uninsured patients in Barrow, Clarke, Jackson, Madison and Oglethorpe counties, to provide “Whole Person Care” that meets patients’ physical, spiritual and emotional needs to improve health outcomes and manage resources more efficiently and effectively.
  • $10,000 to Angel House of Georgia, a Gainesville recovery residence for women with alcohol and/or drug addiction, to enable indigent women with no financial resources or support in Banks, Barrow, Clarke, Hall, Jackson and Madison counties to participate in the twelve-month program by covering their program fees and living expenses, offering these women a second chance at life so they can become productive members of society.
  • $6,750 to Prevent Child Abuse Athens, a grassroots organization focused on ending neglect and abuse of children in Clarke, Madison and Oglethorpe counties, to offer the First Steps primary prevention program that offers support, parenting education and community referrals to new parents to help them with the challenges of parenting.

December 2016

The Jackson EMC Foundation board of directors awarded a total $77,792 in grants during their December meeting, including $74,927 to organizations and $2,865 to an individual.

Organizational Grant Recipients:

  • $15,000 to the Lawrenceville Cooperative Ministry for its Emergency Food Assistance Program, which provides clients with emergency food supplies, buying them time to deal with the difficult and frequently temporary circumstances they are facing and helping them get back on their feet.
  • $15,000 to Project Adam, a non-profit focused on the prevention and treatment of alcohol and drug dependency, to cover the entry fees of 12 men who can’t afford to enter the residential treatment program and do not have family to assist them.
  • $11,927 to Fragile Kids Foundation, a Georgia nonprofit that provides prescribed medical equipment that Medicaid and private insurance will not cover to medically fragile children, to help fund the purchase and installation of critical medical equipment such as electronic wheelchair van lifts, strollers, toileting and bathing systems in the counties Jackson EMC serves.
  • $10,000 to Eyes of Love Lighthouse Mission in Buford, a grassroots ministry that collects and distributes clothes, food and furniture to those in need in Gwinnett, Hall, Barrow counties to help them get back on their feet, to help with rent on the building used to house the mission’s inventory.
  • $8,000 to Eagle Ranch, a Chestnut Mountain home for boys and girls in crisis serving all of Northeast Georgia, to cover the annual subscription costs for an electronic health record database system that securely stores state-required records and tracks the ongoing progress of the youth being served.
  • $7,500 to Adventure Bags, an Auburn-based nonprofit that sources and stuffs comfort bags and distributes them to displaced children through local DFCS offices, domestic violence shelters, fire departments, group homes and children’s shelters in Jackson EMC’s service area to provide comfort and security in a crisis.
  • $5,000 to NOA’s Ark (No One Alone), a Dahlonega emergency shelter and comprehensive support program for women and children from Lumpkin, Gwinnett and Hall counties who have been the victims of domestic violence or sexual assault, to help provide food to shelter residents and outreach clients.
  • $2,500 to Community Helping Place, a Dahlonega non-profit that addresses hunger in the Lumpkin County community, to purchase food for its food pantry.

Individual Grant Recipients:

  • $2,865 to purchase an everyday activity chair for a six-year-old boy with cerebral palsy that will hold his body in place for normal daily activities.

November 2016

The Jackson EMC Foundation board of directors awarded a total $58,910 in grants during their November meeting, including $55,410 to organizations and $3,500 to an individual.

Organizational Grant Recipients:

  • $15,000 to Rape Response, Inc., a Gainesville community-based non-profit that provides comprehensive services to adolescent and adult victims of sexual violence in Hall and Lumpkin Counties, to help fund aftercare and Emergency Room clothing and comfort items for victims, as well as recruitment and training for volunteer advocates. 
  • $7,500 to Family Promise of Gwinnett County for homeless parents staying at the agency’s Salt Light Center emergency shelter under its 30-90 day Homeless Recovery/Sustainability Program, to help provide child care while they look for work or are working.
  • $7,500 to Georgia Options in Bogart to help purchase a van that will provide flexible wheelchair-accessible transportation for people with significant disabilities in Barrow, Clarke, Jackson and Madison counties, allowing them to work, attend school and be involved in community functions.
  • $6,000 to the Place of Seven Springs, a Snellville nonprofit which provides assistance to Gwinnett County residents in need, to provide funds for emergency housing and food.
  • $5,000 to the Athens Community Council on Aging for the Grandparents Raising Grandchildren program, which supports grandparents who are primary caregivers for their grandchildren, to provide emergency food and personal care supplies.
  • $5,000 to H.O.P.E, Inc., a Duluth non-profit serving low-income single parents in Gwinnett and Hall counties who are working to achieve their college degree, to help with childcare and housing when either situation threatens the parent’s ability to continue their classes.
  • $5,000 to the Samaritan Center for Counseling and Wellness, an Athens agency that provides counseling, psychotherapy, education and consultation to residents of surrounding counties without regard for ability to pay, to help lower fees for the uninsured in its Jefferson satellite office.
  • $2,500 to the Spirit of Joy Church Food Bank in Flowery Branch, which distributes food to those in need in Barrow, Hall and Jackson counties, to purchase food.
  • $1,910 to Reins of Life, a Franklin County non-profit that uses  hippotherapy treatment to special needs and at-risk children, youth and their families, to help five Franklin County clients attend therapy sessions that use a horse’s movement to improve neuromuscular function.

Individual Grant Recipients:

  • $3,500 to help purchase a handicap accessible van for an eleven-year-old boy with mitochondrial deficiency/Dravet Syndrome.
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  • October 2016

The Jackson EMC Foundation board of directors awarded a total $90,815 in grants during their October meeting, including $84,100 to organizations and $6,715 to individuals.

Organizational Grant Recipients:

  • $15,000 to Support Adoption & Foster Families Together (SAFFT), a non-profit serving abused and neglected children in Gwinnett, Hall, Jackson and Lumpkin counties through its Family Life Center in Gainesville, to provide access to five months of supervised visitation, case management, parenting training and coaching to four families in crisis who are currently on a waiting list.
  • $15,000 to Rainbow Village, a Duluth long-term, transformational housing program that provides fully furnished apartments and comprehensive support for homeless families with children in North Metro Atlanta, to help provide rent for its early childhood development center facility.
  • $15,000 to the YMCA – Georgia Mountains in Gainesville to help  underprivileged Elementary School children attend the Kids Time Afterschool Program, which provides a safe environment with homework assistance, enrichment activities, relationship building, sports, games and arts and crafts on site at Hall County and Gainesville City elementary schools.
  • $15,000 to the J.M. Tull-Gwinnett Family YMCA for its Afterschool Enrichment Program that will use Kindle Fire tablets and STEM project packs in various subjects and various grade levels, along with education-based field trips to help children from low income families keep pace with science and math learning outside of school.
  • $12,150 to Hope Haven, an Athens agency providing a variety of programs to support developmentally disabled individuals, to help purchase a 15-passenger Ford Transit van that will be used to transport participants to and from community access programs, community living support, residential alternative, prevocational, supported employment, respite and other services.
  • $10,950 to I Am, Inc. in Buford, for the Helping Others Pursue Excellence (HOPE) program which helps girls ages 6-18 meet the challenges of adolescence and adulthood through a coordinated, progressive series of activities and experiences that help them become socially, academically, emotionally, economically and physically competent.
  • $1,000 to the Lawrenceville Woman’s Club to purchase supplies and establish a sustainable community garden in the Glenn Edge neighborhood that will provide an opportunity for residents to connect with nature and each other, and have access to fresh healthy food in exchange for time spent learning and working in the garden.

Individual Grant Recipients:

  • $3,500 to replace the HVAC system of a senior citizen who cares for her disabled brother.
  • $3,215 for dental work and dentures for a senior citizen whose teeth are causing health issues.

September 2016

The Jackson EMC Foundation board of directors awarded a total $66,500 in grants to organizations during their September meeting.

Organizational Grant Recipients:

  • $15,000 to Elachee Nature Science Center in Gainesville to help offer discounts for students in Title 1 schools in Banks, Barrow, Clarke, Gwinnett, Hall, Jackson, Lumpkin and Madison counties to encourage environmental science/nature field trips that provide students with STEM-based educational experiences which cannot be duplicated in the classroom.
  • $15,000 to Wishes 4 Me Foundation, a Lawrenceville charitable organization that provides housing for low-income disabled adults so they may live independently and be a part of the community, to replace the damaged driveway to a home that houses three disabled adults and to help enclose an existing carport to provide housing for two additional disabled adults.
  • $10,000 to Nothing But the Truth, a Dacula faith-based organization dedicated to meeting needs in the community, to purchase food for the Weekend Food Bag Ministry that provides food for the weekend to Gwinnett County public schoolchildren who have been identified by counselors as food insecure.
  • $10,000 to the Rainbow Children’s Home, a Dahlonega shelter for abused and neglected girls, to help fund programs that go beyond the basics of food, clothing and shelter to provide services such as substance abuse treatment, independence and wellness training, and family reunification services.
  • $7,500 to the CASA Hall/Dawson Program, Inc., which trains and supervises community volunteer advocates for abused and neglected children in Juvenile Court proceedings in Hall and Dawson counties, to train 25 new volunteers, cover costs for family visitation, and provide special needs funding for 71 children to provide food and clothing.
  • $5,000 to the Side by Side Brain Injury Clubhouse, a Stone Mountain nonprofit organization that helps individuals recovering from traumatic brain injury to regain employment and living skills, to provide nearly 40 days of rehabilitation services for eight adults from Gwinnett and Clarke counties who are permanently disabled by traumatic brain injury.
  • $4,000 to Lumpkin County Family Connection to purchase food and supplies for its Backpack Buddy program, which provides a supply of 10 pounds of food for seven meals and four snacks each week to children identified by Family Advocacy as food insecure.

August 2016

The Jackson EMC Foundation board of directors awarded a total $105,500 in grants during their August meeting, including $98,500 to organizations and $7,000 to individuals.

Organizational Grant Recipients:

  • $15,000 to Center Point Georgia to provide in-school therapeutic counseling to school-age children and their families through its Wilheit Services, and to offer the Smart Girls program that build character skills to help girls make healthy choices, to students in Gainesville and Hall County schools.
  • $15,000 to Challenged Child & Friends, a Gainesville non-profit organization providing educational, therapeutic, nursing and family support services to children with disabilities in all counties served by Jackson EMC, to support the Early Intervention Program that provides special needs children with classroom instruction, individualized therapy and nursing services.
  • $15,000 to Habitat for Humanity of Jackson County to purchase materials such as plumbing, electrical, HVAC and cabinets that have not been donated for its 14th house, being built for a single father of two teenagers, and its 15th house, being built for a single mother with five children.
  • $15,000 to the Salvation Army – Lawrenceville for the Family Emergency Services program, which prevents homelessness and stabilizes families by providing rent or mortgage financial assistance directly to the landlord or property holder; the agency provided 268 families with rent assistance in 2015.
  • $10,000 to the Salvation Army – Athens, which serves Clarke, Madison and Oglethorpe counties, for emergency shelter operations and to provide food to shelter residents and those in the community who are hungry and seek a meal at the nightly free dinner; the Athens agency provided 17,050 individuals with emergency shelter and served 31,612 meals last year.
  • $10,000 to the Salvation Army - Gainesville, which serves Banks, Barrow, Hall and Jackson counties, for emergency shelter operations and to provide food to shelter residents and those in the community who are hungry and seek a meal at the nightly free dinner; the Gainesville agency provided 5,338 individuals with emergency shelter and served 7,567 meals last year.
  • $7,500 to Habitat for Humanity of Hall County for HVAC, electrical, roofing and flooring for a home being built under the Women Build program in Cooper Glen, the first Habitat Hall subdivision, for a single mother with two children who lost their home to a fire that severely burned her daughter.
  • $6,000 to the Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta to offer The Girl Scout Leadership Experience, a program which impacts 15 developmental outcomes to help girls discover their own strengths, connect with others in healthy relationships and become more resourceful problem solvers, to 203 Gwinnett County girls.
  • $5,000 to Penfield Christian Homes, a Georgia non-profit Christian ministry that provides substance abuse treatment for women and men so that they may return to their families, jobs, churches and communities as productive citizens, to help fund treatment for individuals with no financial resources in all counties served by Jackson EMC.

Individual Grant Recipients:

  • $3,500 to help purchase a handicap accessible van for a handicapped 11-year-old boy.
  • $3,500 to replace the leaking roof of a disabled senior citizen.

July 2016

The Jackson EMC Foundation board of directors awarded a total $92,275 in grants during their July meeting, including $88,775 to organizations and $3,500 to an individual.

Organizational Grant Recipients:

  • $15,000 to the Food Bank of Northeast Georgia in Athens for its monthly Mobile Pantry Program, which distributes large quantities of food before its expiration date through partner agencies in seven counties served by Jackson EMC, eliminating the need for the agencies to store the food and allowing the Food Bank to distribute thousands of pounds of food to those in need at a fraction of the cost.
  • $15,000 to the Hi-Hope Service Center in Lawrenceville to help fund part-time nursing and nutrition services for 20 developmentally disabled residents in Gwinnett County, providing services such as daily medication, insulin, blood checks and specialized medical treatment to residents who require onsite nursing care.
  • $15,000 to View Point Health, a Gwinnett County agency providing support to clients with behavioral health conditions, addictive diseases and developmental disabilities, to provide uninsured and underinsured clients with primary and specialty health care by assisting with copays for office visits, lab work, and pharmacy screenings through Four Corners Primary Care.
  • $10,000 to the Gwinnett Council for the Arts to help fund The Healing Arts, an art-centered program for people who are facing or in the midst of a medical, physical or emotional crisis that provides a safe outlet for them to come to terms with emotional conflicts, increase self-awareness and express unspoken and often unconscious concerns about their illness and lives.
  • $10,000 to Lilburn Cooperative Ministry to provide 40 needy families with $250 assistance for rent or mortgage payments annually, helping them to avoid foreclosure or eviction.
  • $10,000 to Tiny Stitches, Inc. in Suwanee, which uses a network of volunteers to make handmade tote bags filled with a 37-item layette that will keep the infant warm and dry for the first 2-3 months of life, donated to mothers in Gwinnett, Hall, Jackson and Lumpkin counties who have little or nothing for their newborns.
  • $7,500 to Ser Familia, a comprehensive social services program in Buford for Latino families, to provide culturally and linguistically appropriate mental health counseling services, including domestic violence, sexual abuse, and suicide counseling.
  • $3,180 to the Madison County Youth Leadership Development Program, which uses instructional materials from the University of Georgia’s Fannin Institute to teach Madison County High School students skills that will allow them to be effective leaders, for a ropes course at Camp Mikell Blue Ridge Outdoor Center and instructor/participant manuals.
  • $3,095 to the Dahlonega Care Center for its Pregnancy Resource Center’s Earn While You Learn program, which provides life skills training necessary for successful parenting while earning credits that can be used for childcare essentials such as diapers, wipes, formula and baby clothes.

Individual Grant Recipients:

  • $3,500 to work in partnership with Habitat for Humanity to replace the leaking roof on the home of a disabled senior citizen.

June 2016

The Jackson EMC Foundation board of directors awarded a total $89,559 in grants during their June meeting, including $83,500 to organizations and $6,059 to individuals.

Organizational Grant Recipients:

  • $15,000 to the American Red Cross of Northeast Georgia to provide disaster relief, including food, shelter, personal needs and clothing, to families in Banks, Barrow, Clarke, Franklin, Hall, Jackson, Lumpkin, Madison and Oglethorpe counties who have lost their home to a fire or natural disaster.
  • $13,000 to Jubilee Partners, a nonprofit Christian services community in Comer, Georgia, that assists newly arrived refuges screened by the U.S. State Department settle where they can learn English, cultural and practical skills and recover from war trauma and subsistence living in refugee camps, for medical services and transportation, household supplies, special clothing and English as a second language materials.
  • $12,000 to St. Vincent de Paul at St. Patrick’s Catholic Church in Norcross, an organization of volunteers who give their time to assist families that have fallen on hard times, to help fund emergency financial assistance for housing assistance, including rent, mortgage and temporary housing to avoid eviction and foreclosure, and prevent homelessness.
  • $10,000 to the Potter’s House, an Atlanta Mission facility, to help feed, house, counsel and provide educational programs such as adult literacy to men who are recovering from substance abuse through an intensive residential program at this 570-acre working farm in Jefferson.
  • $8,500 to the Ark United Ministry Outreach Center in Athens to provide emergency financial assistance that will help prevent eviction and reduce homelessness for workers in low-wage jobs, the disabled and the elderly in Clarke, Madison and Oglethorpe counties who are facing unexpected expenses.
  • $7,500 to Lekotek of Georgia, a charitable organization that provides children with disabilities with accessible play, adaptive technology and toys, information and resources, to provide services through its Gainesville satellite office to serve ten new families from Barrow, Clarke, Franklin, Hall, Jackson, Lumpkin and Madison counties, and to purchase additional adaptive toys and technology.
  • $6,000 to Creative Community Services to help purchase a van to transport youth for the STEP Program, which helps prepare young people to transition out of the state foster care system and into independent adulthood, preventing them from ending up in mental institutions, homeless shelters or jails as adults.
  • $5,000 to Jewish Family and Career Services, a nonsectarian agency providing human services programs to a diverse population of low to moderate income, underserved and in need individuals in Gwinnett County, for basic dental services provided through its Ben Massell Dental Clinic.
  • $4,000 to the Franklin Life Pregnancy Center, a volunteer, Christian ministry that provides testing, counseling, and parenting classes for expectant teens and their families, to help provide the “Earn While You Learn” program that teaches parenting skills and provides essential child care items. 
  • $2,500 to Helping Mamas, a Snellville nonprofit that provides essential baby items to Gwinnett County women and children in need, to help purchase diapers, cribs and car seats not available through public assistance programs.

Individual Grant Recipients:

  • $1,575 to replace a leaking back door for a young man disabled by ankylosing spondylitis, a form of arthritis.
  • $3,500 to help purchase a handicapped accessible van for a man injured and disabled by an ATV accident.
  • $984 to purchase a lift chair for a disabled senior citizen

May 2016

The Jackson EMC Foundation board of directors awarded a total $99,735 in grants during their May meeting, including $90,985 to organizations and $8,750 to individuals.

Organizational Grant Recipients:

  • $15,000 to Boys & Girls Clubs of Metro Atlanta’s Lawrenceville Unit for its Homework Help/Afterschool Program, which uses staff and volunteers to provide club members with homework help, specialized tutoring and high-yield learning activities to improve baseline math and reading skills.
  • $15,000 to Lindsay’s Legacy, Inc. in Jackson County to help fund the coordinator’s position for a program which recruits and trains adult mentors to work with students kindergarten through 12th grade in all three school systems within the county, helping to ensure those young people become healthy, educated and employable.
  • $15,000 to MedLink Georgia, a non-profit primary medical care network which provides care to those who lack access to quality medical care because of finances, transportation or few local physicians, to purchase equipment for six new examination rooms in their expanded Colbert facility that serves Madison, Clarke and Oglethorpe counties.
  • $14,985 to Boy Scouts of America – NEGA Council to provide uniforms, handbooks and summer camp fees that will help underprivileged youth participate in scouting, teaching them to make ethical choices and promoting citizenship, leadership, mental and physical fitness.
  • $10,000 to the Interfaith Hospitality Network of Athens, a network of 23 area congregations and 750 volunteers that provides temporary housing and services to homeless families in need, to cover transportation expenses, emergency medical, dental and financial needs, and provide childcare so homeless parents can work or seek work.
  • $6,500 to Athens-Clarke County Treatment and Accountability Court, a partnership of court, law enforcement and community mental health treatment providers that jointly work to improve services to offenders with serious and persistent mental health issues, to provide basic dental and vision care, and respite housing to transition participants from jail into the community.
  • $5,500 to FOCUS (Families of Children Under Stress), a nonprofit agency serving children, teens and adults with developmental disabilities and their families, to help provide Camp Hollywood in Lawrenceville, a unique summer day camp where children with developmental disabilities can build social skills, self-respect, character and community living skills.
  • $5,000 to Quinlan Visual Arts Center in Gainesville to enable about 40 disadvantaged, but exceptional students with exemplary artistic skills entering 1st-8th grades at Title I schools in Barrow, Hall, Jackson, Gwinnett and Lumpkin counties attend one-week Art Camp sessions. 
  • $4,000 to the Disabled American Veterans – Chapter 92 for its Veterans Relief Fund, which provides assistance for emergency needs such as rent, medical bills, groceries, or a bus ticket home to veterans and their families.

Individual Grant Recipients:

  • $1,750 to purchase dentures for a low-income senior citizen.
  • $3,500 to help purchase a handicapped accessible van for a man left a quadriplegic by an accident.
  • $3,500 to purchase a lightweight electric wheelchair and hand controls for a woman who lost the use of her legs following vascular surgery

April 2016

The Jackson EMC Foundation board of directors awarded a total $125,426 in grants during their April meeting, including $123,426 to organizations and $2,000 to an individual.

Organizational Grant Recipients:

  • $15,000 to Camp Koinonia in Homer to provide 60 Banks County underprivileged third through sixth grade students referred by Family Connection and DFACS with a five-day camping experience that provides positive learning experiences to establish strong character, leadership and teambuilding skills and build personal relationships.
  • $15,000 to Extra Special People in Watkinsville to provide an opportunity for special needs or seriously ill children from low income or financially distressed families in Barrow, Clarke, Gwinnett, Jackson and Madison counties to attend an eight week camp experience where they can explore nature, discover their own abilities, master new skills and make new friends.
  • $15,000 to Exodus Outreach, a Buford nonprofit organization serving people in all walks of life who are hurting and in need of support, for a summer program that offers kindergarten through eighth grade at-risk students in Gwinnett and Hall counties with a supervised summer learning and development curriculum that readies students to succeed in school in the fall.
  • $15,000 to Gwinnett Student Leadership for its student leadership program, a two-year program serving high school juniors and seniors in 23 public schools, providing practical leadership skills and training to return to their home high school to facilitate the core leadership principles with groups there to increase the capacity to develop student leaders.
  • $15,000 to the Summer Scholars Institute, a three-year academic enrichment program held at the University of North Georgia’s Gainesville campus to help at-risk middle and high school students in Hall County prepare for college and careers by concentrating on the basic areas of reading, writing and mathematics, along with science for third-year students.
  • $12,500 to Camp Twin Lakes, a not-for-profit organization which offers year-round recreational, therapeutic and educational programs for children facing serious illness and other challenges, to help children in Jackson EMC’s 10-county service area attend its state-of-the-art, fully accessible campsites.
  • $10,000 to Spectrum Autism Support Group, a parent-run non-profit group in Suwanee that provides support, education and resources for the entire spectrum of autism disorders to families in Barrow, Gwinnett, Hall and Jackson counties, to enable disadvantaged autistic individuals ages four to 22 to attend the organization’s weeklong summer camp program where daily activities are used to teach social skills lessons.
  • $10,000 to the Young Women’s Christian Organization (YWCO) in Athens to help girls from low income families attend the Girls Club, a structured recreational and educational summer program targeting young girls ages 5-14 from low-to-moderate income families, and to help defray bus transportation expenses. 
  • $8,000 to Camp Kudzu, a year-round camping program for children with diabetes and their families to teach diabetes management skills that will reduce their risk of diabetes-related complications, as well as improve their attitude about living with the disease, to help children from the 10 counties served by Jackson EMC attend a one-week overnight summer camp.
  • $3,500 to Good Samaritan Ministry of Northeast Georgia, a Gainesville non-profit that provides food, clothing, furniture, job counseling and education assistance to those in need in Banks, Barrow, Clarke, Gwinnett, Hall, Jackson and Lumpkin counties, to purchase food and personal hygiene items.
  • $2,000 to Camp To Belong, a free summer camp that reunites brothers and sisters living separately in foster care or other out-of-home care to strengthen relationships, increase self-esteem, create healthier attitudes and childhood memories, to enable children in the 10 counties Jackson EMC serves to attend the camp.
  • $1,475 to the Gainesville 1st United Methodist Church Urban Ministry to help fund a summer soccer camp for at-risk elementary school-aged children in the Baker and Glover neighborhood.
  • $951 to Northeast Georgia RESA (Regional Educational Service Agencies) to fund iPad applications and amplification for four itinerant teachers who service nearly 100 students in Barrow, Clarke, Jackson, Madison and Oglethorpe counties who have a variety of types and degrees of hearing loss, cognitive and physical areas of need, to provide them with a variety of opportunities for meaningful and engaging lessons.

Individual Grant Recipients:

  • $2,000 to replace the hearing aids of a senior citizen.

March 2016

The Jackson EMC Foundation board of directors awarded a total $147,528 in grants during their March meeting, including $144,863 to organizations and $2,665 to an individual.

Organizational Grant Recipients:

  • $15,000 to For Her Glory, a Gainesville agency that provides breast cancer patients in Banks, Barrow, Franklin, Gwinnett, Hall, Jackson and Lumpkin counties with items that are not covered by insurance, such as wigs, bras, compression sleeves and gloves.
  • $15,000 to Good News Clinics, a non-profit organization that provides free medical and dental care to the underserved and uninsured residents of Gainesville and Hall County, to ensure clients of its Sam Poole Medical Clinic have laboratory tests necessary for physicians to determine their health care needs and provide them with appropriate care.
  • $15,000 to Hebron Community Health Center in Lawrenceville, a nonprofit organization providing medical and dental care to low-income, uninsured Gwinnett residents, to provide diagnostic follow-up testing, eye exams and prescription glasses, and prescription medication, glucose monitors and glucose strips.
  • $15,000 to the Next Stop Foundation, a Lawrenceville grassroots organization that provides social interaction, recreational and life skill learning opportunities to young adults with mild to moderate disabilities in Gwinnett and Hall counties, to help fund an occupational therapist that works with members to develop new skills, adapt tasks for success, become more fully integrated into society and achieve a higher level of independence.
  • $15,000 to the Norcross Cooperative Ministry for its Emergency Food Assistance Program that provides families a four-five day supply of non-perishable items once a month for up to six times a year in order to help those experiencing a household crisis, such as a delay in child support, unexpected bills, unemployment or under-employment.
  • $15,000 to the North Gwinnett Cooperative Ministry for its Medication Assistance Program, which covers the cost of non-narcotic/controlled substance prescriptions for senior citizens and families that qualify for assistance when the amount of medication is too much or the co-pays are too costly.
  • $15,000 to Step by Step Recovery, a Lawrenceville community-based grassroots addiction recovery organization which provides a safe and structured environment for both men and women over 6 months to 2 years as they complete a 12 step program to deal with drug and alcohol addiction, to assist with rent for men’s and women’s units.
  • $11,463 to the Gwinnett County Public Library to purchase a “pop-up” library featuring a reading room with seating and connectivity that will allow the library to increase library access for underserved residents, who could sign up for library cards, see demonstrations of services, engage in portable children’s activities and technology tutorials, increasing their access to books, digital resources and other services. 
  • $10,000 to Junior Achievement of Georgia for program materials, support materials and supplies, and program development to provide the JA Biztown and JA Finance Park interactive programs at Discovery High School to more than 30,000 Gwinnett County middle school students, teaching them the concepts of financial literacy, business, entrepreneurship and career readiness.
  • $6,400 to Citizens Advocacy of Athens/Clarke County, a non-profit agency that develops one-to-one personal relationships between people with disabilities and local citizens for advocacy and protection, to help pay the salary of a part-time support coordinator.
  • $5,000 to New Beginnings Ministry of Franklin County, a faith-based recovery program serving women who have addictions and their families, for its Project S.M.I.L.E. that provides single mothers with room and board, meals, transportation, life-skills education, and recovery classes, while providing daycare and playground facilities so that mothers are not separated from their children during their recovery.
  • $5,000 to Quilts for Kids Northeast Georgia Chapter, a non-profit organization that uses volunteers to sew comforting quilts that are distributed to children at the Northeast Georgia Medical Center, Athens Regional Medical Center Pediatric Floor, Gateway Domestic Violence Shelter and Family Promise of Hall County, for the purchase of fabric.
  • $2,000 to Path Project, a Gwinnett non-profit dedicated to helping at-risk children close the achievement gap and find the right path for their lives, for its Middle/High Leadership Academy that helps students set goals and work with positive role models to obtain the life skills necessary to overcome barriers, succeed academically and graduate high school with a plan for their future.

Individual Grant Recipients:

  • $2,665 to replace the wheelchair of a woman who was left a paraplegic by a motorcycle accident.

February 2016

The Jackson EMC Foundation board of directors awarded a total $57,000 in grants to organizations during their February meeting.

Organizational Grant Recipients:

  • $15,000 to the Madison County Senior Center to help fund the Home Delivered Meals program, which allows frail and older citizens to maintain independence and dignity, while receiving nutritious meals, nutrition screening, education and counseling services, and opportunities for social contact.  The center currently serves 52 home delivered meals daily, five days a week, and has a waiting list of six people.
  • $15,000 to the YMCA Piedmont (Brad Akins Branch) for its Summer Day Camp to enable 20 children ages 5-13 from economically disadvantaged families to attend an 11-week day camp that provides a safe environment and nurturing quality programs for youths that might otherwise be “latchkey” kids during their schools’ summer break.
  • $11,000 to L.A.M.P. Ministries in Gainesville for its Community Youth and Children’s program, three-month sessions open to young people ages 7-17 that combine group counseling and community activities to provide high risk youths in Hall and Jackson counties with a positive alternative to gangs, drugs and other delinquent behavior.
  • $6,000 to 100 Black Men of North Metro Atlanta for its “Men of Tomorrow” program in Gwinnett County that provides underserved youth age 12-18 years of age with mentor/role models and education in life skills, healthy living, financial literacy and African American history to help these young men improve academics, attitude, graduation rate and goal setting.
  • $5,000 to the Athens Regional Foundation to enable twenty uninsured or underinsured patients from an area covering Banks, Barrow, Clarke, Franklin, Gwinnett, Jackson, Madison, and Oglethorpe counties to participate in the “Power to Change”, an individualized educational program for diabetic or pre-diabetic individuals that enables them to adhere to a meal plan, manage foot self-exams and reduce their HbA1c number. 
  • $2,500 to the ALS Association of Georgia for its Equipment Loaner Program, which provides equipment not typically covered by insurance, Medicare or Medicaid at no cost to individuals living with ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis), a degenerative neurological disease, from all counties served by Jackson EMC.
  • $2,500 to the Gainesville/Hall County Community Food Pantry to purchase food from the Atlanta Community Food Bank and the Georgia Mountain Food Bank for distribution to those in need in Hall County.

January 2016

The Jackson EMC Foundation board of directors awarded a total $80,393 in grants during their January meeting, including $76,893 to organizations and $3,500 to an individual.

Organizational Grant Recipients:

  • $15,000 to the Children’s Center for Hope & Healing in Gainesville to provide 32 children who have been sexually abused with therapy to reduce trauma symptoms such as nightmares, bed wetting, anxiousness, depression, anger, fatigue and self-hatred, and for their families to decrease the sense of isolation, strengthen the family, assist with parent-child attachment and family functioning.
  • $15,000 to Our Neighbor, a Gainesville grassroots non-profit organization dedicated to assisting young adults with special challenges, to assist two residents, one with traumatic brain injuries who needs physical, speech and communication therapy and a second with aggressive lymphoma who needs clothes, supplies for their residence and nutritional supplements.
  • $15,000 to The Tree House, a children’s advocacy center working to reduce child abuse in Barrow, Jackson and Banks counties, for the Family Services Supervised Visitation Program, which provides a neutral, child-friendly environment for visits between children in foster care and their parents to enable them to maintain and enhance family bonds and provide a safe and nurturing environment for their children when reunited.
  • $12,000 to the Gainesville/Hall County Alliance for Literacy to purchase materials and provide instructors for basic literacy classes for adults 16 and older and GED preparation classes for students who have not completed high school.  The 2011 U.S. Census reports that about 34 percent of Hall County residents are not high school graduates and 11 percent have less than a 9th grade education.
  • $7,000 to the Asian American Resource Center, a Gwinnett non-profit which provides supportive services to members of the community in need, for its Transitional Housing Program that provides homeless single mothers and their children with up to 24 months of housing assistance and support services to transition them to permanent housing. 
  • $6,893 to Harmony House Child Advocacy Center, a non-profit organization serving Madison, Franklin and Oglethorpe counties that coordinates child abuse investigation and intervention services, to purchase a forensic interview camera, to support its parenting program and to help fund its victim services program which provides counseling, clothing, and transportation assistance.
  • $6,000 to Jackson County 4-H Robotics Program to purchase parts, materials, power tools and technology to participate in the FIRST Robotics Competition for high school students, a program which includes teams from round the world, that builds science, engineering and technology skills, inspires innovation and promotes well-rounded life skills.

Individual Grant Recipients:

  • $3,500 to replace the non-working HVAC system of a widowed senior citizen.